Why Commvault should be top of your list if you are looking at any kind of new Data Protection solution

Data Protection is a challenge for most organisations and with the move to virtualisation and the cloud things have just got more complicated. So if your current solution is struggling to backup your data in the available time, is becoming unreliable or just lacks the required features, then the time has come to re-think your Data Protection strategy.

Now there are plenty of point solutions that are very good, the most obvious one being Veeam Backup and Replication, but it does tend to run out of steam as your data protection requirements and capacities increase.

So what’s so good about Commvault?

It’s open and flexible, minimises lock-in and maximises choice

  • It is OS, hypervisor, public cloud, storage array and application agnostic – with all major platforms supported
  • It can backup VMs, physical servers, remote office data, end-point data, IaaS VMs (i.e. AWS & Azure) and SaaS applications (i.e. Office 365 & Salesforce.com)
  • It can efficiently de-duplicate and compress data so that low cost storage devices can be used in place of more expensive Purpose-Built Backup Appliances
  • It can archive data to improve efficiency or for compliance
  • It can backup, and sync and share files across laptops and desktops
  • It can backup and archive to the cloud (IaaS VMs or object storage), replicate to the cloud for DR and run in the cloud
  • It can restore (migrate) servers/VMs to different hypervisors or clouds
  • It can provision and monitor resources across hypervisors and public clouds

It can meet the performance needs of environments of any size or complexity

  • It provides techniques for performing high-speed backups and restores:
    • Management of storage array snapshots
    • Forever Incrementals and Synthetic Fulls
    • Block-Level (rather than much slower file-level) backups
  • It is a distributed solution with centralised management that can start small and scale very large (i.e. from SMB to Enterprise)
  • It can perform full text searches across all backup and archive data so you can find the data you are looking for quickly

It reduces administration

  • It provides all capabilities from a single code-base to maximise efficiency
  • It has a scalable licencing model that includes per socket and per VM hypervisor protection – price is no longer a barrier to deploying Commvault
  • It has world-class support run directly out of the UK

Conclusion
Commvault is a world-class solution that was built from the ground-up to meet the data protection needs of any scale of infrastructure (on-premises, public cloud or hybrid) – something no other product can do.

So if your current solution is struggling to backup your data in the time available, is becoming unreliable or just lacks specific data protection features that you need, then take a look at Commvault – I think you will be impressed and don’t just take my word for it, Gartner has rated it number one for the last 6 years (you can read the full report here).

Mark Burgess has worked in IT since 1984, starting as a programmer on DEC VAX systems, then moving into PC software development using Clipper and FoxPro. From here he moved into network administration using Novell NetWare, which kicked-off his interest in storage. In 1999 he co-founded SNS, a consultancy firm initially focused on Novell technologies, but overtime Virtualisation and Storage. Mark writes a popular blog and is a frequent contributor to Twitter and other popular Virtualisation and Storage blog sites.
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About Mark Burgess

Mark Burgess has worked in IT since 1984, starting as a programmer on DEC VAX systems, then moving into PC software development using Clipper and FoxPro. From here he moved into network administration using Novell NetWare, which kicked-off his interest in storage. In 1999 he co-founded SNS, a consultancy firm initially focused on Novell technologies, but overtime Virtualisation and Storage. Mark writes a popular blog and is a frequent contributor to Twitter and other popular Virtualisation and Storage blog sites.

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