VMware Software-Defined Data Center Introduction Video now available on YouTube

VMware may well be about to change the world again, with the final pieces of the Software-Defined Data Centre falling into place. Until recently – SDDC looked like vapourware, however – with the release of Virtual SAN, EVO:RAIL, Flash Read Cache and the much anticipated arrival of NSX networking, it is finally a reality. To get you up to speed, we’ve provided a short introductory video on VMware SDDC – It’s less than 10 mins and should allow you to get a good idea of what this latest development offers your organisation. Of course – if you want more information on any of the subjects covered – then give us a call, drop us an email to info@snsltd.co.uk, or drill Continue reading

Lock-in, choice, competition, innovation, commoditisation and the Software-Defined Data Centre

I have recently been involved in an ongoing debate about VMware VSAN and lock-in over at http://blog.nigelpoulton.com/vsan-is-no-better-than-a-hw-array/, and it inspired me to explore my thoughts on the subject further. It seems clear to me that the organisations are on a trajectory to the Software-Defined Data Centre – the Cloud, the Google/Amazon DC architectures and many other economic factors will result in the inevitable decline in hardware appliances. The 21st century has seen a commoditisation of hardware, with most appliance vendors supplying standard off-the-shelf solutions that are almost certainly not manufactured by them. Take a company like NetApp, are they a hardware or a software company and where is their value? They sell both hardware and software, but the hardware is fundamentally no Continue reading

An introduction to VMware NSX Software-Defined Networking technology

Over the past decade VMware has changed the way IT is provisioned through the use of Virtual Machines, but if we want a truly Software-Defined Data Centre we also need to virtualise the storage and the network. For storage virtualisation VMware has introduced Virtual SAN and Virtual Volumes (expected to be available in 2015), and for network virtualisation NSX. In this, the third of a three part series, we will take a look at NSX. The problem with networks today is that they are just too complex, if a Virtual Machine has a particular networking requirement then this would typically require that a change request goes to another team, who then have to make changes at the network hardware level – this is not Continue reading

An introduction to VMware Virtual Volumes Software-Defined Storage technology

Over the past decade VMware has changed the way IT is provisioned through the use of Virtual Machines, but if we want a truly Software-Defined Data Centre we also need to virtualise the storage and the network. For storage virtualisation VMware has introduced Virtual SAN and Virtual Volumes (expected to be available in 2015), and for network virtualisation NSX. In this, the second of a three part series, we will take a look at Virtual Volumes (VVOLs). Each new release of vSphere always delivers significant new storage related enhancements, from Storage DRS to vStorage APIs for Array Integration, VMware has consistently innovated. But one huge feature has always been missing – the ability to natively store a VMDK as an object directly on a Continue reading

An introduction to VMware Virtual SAN Software-Defined Storage technology

Over the past decade VMware has changed the way IT is provisioned through the use of Virtual Machines, but if we want a truly Software-Defined Data Centre we also need to virtualise the storage and the network. For storage virtualisation VMware has introduced Virtual SAN and Virtual Volumes (expected to be available in 2015), and for network virtualisation NSX. In this, the first of a three part series, we will take a look at Virtual SAN (VSAN). So why VSAN? Large Data Centres, built by the likes of Amazon, Google and Facebook, utilise commodity compute, storage and networking hardware (that scale-out rather than scale-up) and a proprietary software layer to massively drive down costs. The economics of IT hardware tend to be the inverse of Continue reading