EMC Data Domain takes another significant leap forward

Data Domain has been a hugely successful product for EMC and as we enter the cloud and software-defined storage era they have once again enhanced the technology with a couple of great new features:

Cloud Tier
Data Domain can now support both an active tier and a cloud tier – using a Data Movement Policy. Data that is of a specific age will be automatically moved out of the active tier into your public or private cloud object storage platform of choice, fully de-duplicated, for long term retention.

Data can be encrypted (using DD Encryption) and locked (using DD Retention Lock) before tiering it to the cloud, and a separate DD Cloud Tier licence is required.

The capacity of the cloud tier can be up to double the size of the active tier and the DD4200, DD4500, DD7200, DD990, DD9500 and Data Domain Virtual Edition are all supported.

Virtual Edition
Data Domain can now be deployed as a vSphere Virtual Machine with capacity starting at 1 TB, and growing to a current maximum of 16 TB, in 1 TB increments.

The deployment wizard includes an assessment tool which ensures that the storage infrastructure meets the necessary performance requirements and the following software modules are included as standard:

  • DD Boost – to speed backups by up to 50%
  • DD Encryption – for enhanced security of data
  • DD Replicator – which enables network-efficient replication

When this VM is combined with the Cloud Tier option you could see how a maximum of a 16 TB active tier and a maximum long term retention tier of 32 TB should easily meet the needs of most small to medium sized organisations, or the remote offices of large enterprises.

Related Posts

  1. An introduction to EMC Unity – new mid-range unified storage platform
  2. Move inactive data to the cloud with EMC CloudArray
Mark Burgess has worked in IT since 1984, starting as a programmer on DEC VAX systems, then moving into PC software development using Clipper and FoxPro. From here he moved into network administration using Novell NetWare, which kicked-off his interest in storage. In 1999 he co-founded SNS, a consultancy firm initially focused on Novell technologies, but overtime Virtualisation and Storage. Mark writes a popular blog and is a frequent contributor to Twitter and other popular Virtualisation and Storage blog sites.
twittergoogle_pluslinkedinmailtwittergoogle_pluslinkedinmailby feather

About Mark Burgess

Mark Burgess has worked in IT since 1984, starting as a programmer on DEC VAX systems, then moving into PC software development using Clipper and FoxPro. From here he moved into network administration using Novell NetWare, which kicked-off his interest in storage. In 1999 he co-founded SNS, a consultancy firm initially focused on Novell technologies, but overtime Virtualisation and Storage. Mark writes a popular blog and is a frequent contributor to Twitter and other popular Virtualisation and Storage blog sites.

Leave a Reply