Building a next-generation on-premises infrastructure

As much as the cloud is having a significant impact on how IT is deployed, on-premises infrastructure is here to stay. Over the last few years the industry has made huge progress with regard to Storage Performance, Systems Availability and Operational Simplicity – let’s take a look at some of our solutions that enable you to take advantage of these and build a next-generation infrastructure:

Hyper-Converged Infrastructure
We have several options available that:

  • Combine compute and storage into a single scale-out solution
  • Enable simplified provisioning, management and upgrading

HCI solutions are taking over from separate compute and storage as they promise to deliver the simplicity of the cloud.

Continuous Availability
We have several options available that:

  • Automate disaster recovery fail-over
  • Achieve zero downtime even when there has been a major storage outage
  • Enable non-disruptive workload mobility between sites for disaster avoidance and workload balancing

Continuous Availability solutions are the next-generation of business continuity technology and have many advantages over legacy active/passive replication.

Software-Defined Storage
We have several options available that:

  • Separate the purchase of storage platform software from the hardware
  • Provide a scale-out architecture that delivers all of the benefits of an HCI solution

Over the years many products have been deployed as a turn-key appliance (i.e. a storage array) whilst many others (i.e. a backup solution) purely as software – today most storage platforms have the option of being purchased as software only.

On-premises Object Storage
We have several options available that:

  • Are simple to deploy, manage, upgrade and scale (to PBs)
  • Replicate the data so that a backup is not required
  • Tier to public cloud object stores (for data that can be held in the cloud)
  • Use industry standard APIs so are compatible with applications that support cloud object storage

The benefits of cloud object storage, such as Amazon S3 and Glacier, are considerable, but for many organisations they just cannot store data in the cloud therefore an on-premises equivalent is required.

Data-Centre Hosting
We have several options available including:

  • Rack space for hosting your own equipment
  • WAN circuits to link your data centres
  • High-speed low latency layer 2 networks for stretched clusters
  • Direct Connect circuits to the leading cloud providers

For many organisations it makes more sense to use specialist hosting facilities rather than hosting kit within their own offices.

General Hardware and Software
To complete the picture we have a range of complimentary hardware and software solutions:

  • Storage arrays – including flash and hybrid, SAN and NAS
  • Backup appliances – with de-duplication to eliminate the need for tape
  • Data Protection software – for unified backup and archiving
  • Monitoring software – for end-to-end visibility of performance & availability
  • Virtualisation software – for use with separate compute or HCI solutions
  • Encryption services – of data at rest and in flight
  • Networking – from Edge to Core, and Fibre Channel and Ethernet
  • Desktops and laptops – including all leading brands
  • Servers – including all leading brands and “white-box”

Conclusion
A lot has changed with regard to on-premises infrastructure over the past few years – driven by virtualisation, flash storage, software-defined technologies and the need to simplify.

Related Posts

  1. Transitioning to a “Cloud Ready” data centre
Mark Burgess has worked in IT since 1984, starting as a programmer on DEC VAX systems, then moving into PC software development using Clipper and FoxPro. From here he moved into network administration using Novell NetWare, which kicked-off his interest in storage. In 1999 he co-founded SNS, a consultancy firm initially focused on Novell technologies, but overtime Virtualisation and Storage. Mark writes a popular blog and is a frequent contributor to Twitter and other popular Virtualisation and Storage blog sites.
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About Mark Burgess

Mark Burgess has worked in IT since 1984, starting as a programmer on DEC VAX systems, then moving into PC software development using Clipper and FoxPro. From here he moved into network administration using Novell NetWare, which kicked-off his interest in storage. In 1999 he co-founded SNS, a consultancy firm initially focused on Novell technologies, but overtime Virtualisation and Storage. Mark writes a popular blog and is a frequent contributor to Twitter and other popular Virtualisation and Storage blog sites.

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